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#61 JoeBlunt

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    ✩1.6 Hdi Desire 2 16v ✩

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Posted 23 October 2009 - 09:00 AM

Engine Oil - The Facts

You need ACEA A3/B3/B4

Explanation:

If a bottle of oil does not contain the following basic information
then DO NOT buy it look for something that does!

1) The purpose for which it is intended (i.e. Motor oil, Gear oil etc)
2) The viscosity (i.e. 10w-40, 5w-30 etc for Motor oils and 80w-90, 75w-90 etc for Gear oils)
3) The specifications that it meets (should contain both API and ACEA ratings)
4) The OEM Approvals that it carries and the codes (i.e. MB229.3, VW503.00, BMW LL01 etc)

Ignore the marketing blurb on the label it is in many cases meaningless and I will explain later
what statements you should treat this with some scepticism

So, what does the above information mean and why is it important?

THE BASICS

All oils are intended for an application and in general are not interchangeable. You would not for
example put an Automatic Transmission Oil or a Gear Oil in your engine! It is important to know what
the oils intended purpose is.

VISCOSITY

Most oils on the shelves today are
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2010 (10) Peugeot 207 1.4 Hdi Grey 5dr
2011 (61) Peugeot 207 1.4 Hdi Black 5dr
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#62 JoeBlunt

JoeBlunt

    ✩1.6 Hdi Desire 2 16v ✩

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Posted 08 July 2011 - 09:10 AM

HEATER BLOWERHaving read about some people needing to access the blower via the passenger side and others via the driver's side, I took a guess and started by taking out the glove box and the "felt" trim below it.
Removing the glove box was a little "interesting" since it involved disconnecting the courtesy light and "unhooking" the plastic vent pipe that chills/heats the glovebox. 8 screws around the front edge and one bigger one underneath at the back. Had to take the "door" off (another three screws) in order to get to the four lower front screws.
This offered a pretty good view of the blower assembly but nothing that looked like a resistor pack. I could see two connectors plugged into what looked like a motor housing

So I went in via the driver's side, just removing the felt above the pedals. Couldn't see anything apart from the large black plastic housings, with white cogs presumably to open flaps, etc.
I remembered reading about having to open the recycle flap, so I started the engine and pressed the recycle button and watched (from by the clutch pedal) as one of the white cogs turned and a larger than expected portion of what I thought was solid black duct slid open.
This revealed the drum-shaped fan rotor - and the opening was big enough to get my quite large hands in and feel that there was nothing like a resistor pack in there at all.

So I figured I was right the first time and went back to the passenger side. Another check of the internet and I read about having to remove the motor assembly in order to get to the transistor pack.
I stared at the assembly for a while before realising that it could just be turned and removed....no retaining screw fitted and no other catch/latch.
So I disconnected the two plugs (and undid another plug to clear a collection of wires out of the way so I would be able to get the housing out) and then turned the housing clockwise (with a little force) and it came free. The significant part of the "locking mechanism was the very end of a square/rectanglar "bar" in the moulded assembly (with a green label on, in the photo below), this also was the best way to get a good grip on the assembly to turn it.
I managed to lift out the asssembly and realised it is not like any other I've seen in threads like these. The shiny heatsink bit, where I guess the transistors are(?), is completely different to the images I've seen. No visible transistors and no easy way to get it off.

I did notice that I could knock out rather a lot of "brown dust" from inside the motor casing, possibly the fall-out from the motor brush wear over the 8 years, I guess.

So with no visible sign of anything I could fix (or replace, apart from the whole thing) I thought I'd try reconnecting it (loose - without replacing it) and measure voltages. When I hooked it up and turned on the ignition, nothing happened initially while I measured 14 volts on the thick red cable, but when I turned the assembly to try to get to the other teminals, the rotor started spinning!! Fortunately, it was on the lowest speed so it didn't jump about or damage itself.

I couldn't find any bad connections that would stop it spinning again so all I could do was put it all back together and I now have a working fan...it seems.

Maybe I had a bad connection, or the "brush dust" was clogging it up a bit but I guess the only proper solution would be a complete replacement of the housing.

Anyway, hope this helps.

I took a few photos in case anyone is in a similar position to what I was and hasn't yet worked out how to get to the blower.

Glove box removed (blower already out, glove box duct rotated upwards out of the way)
Glove Box Aperture

Sequence showing blower itself being replaced (1. loose, 2. half-way there, 3. locked home - note green label on "rectangular bar" that is best for hold while turning the assembly - it is the end of this that seems to "lock-in")
Bayonet-action of blower assembly

The blower housing with the blower removed (you can see where the securing screw might be, to the top-right. You can also see right through and out through the open "re-cycle" vent - crescent-shaped hole - into the driver's foot-well)
Blower housing

The blower assembly itself (showing the two connector sockets, a screw there seems little point in undoing and to the right, where the securing screw might have been).
Blower assembly end-on

The blower assembly from the side (showing how the shiny heatsink is completely "inside" the assembly, covered by the rotor-drum aand has no visible transistors)
Blower assembly side view

Courtesy of Pedro :)
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2010 (10) Peugeot 207 1.4 Hdi Grey 5dr
2011 (61) Peugeot 207 1.4 Hdi Black 5dr
joeblunt@hotmail.com